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Cerebellar Involvement in Cognitive Sequencing

Cerebellar Involvement in Cognitive Sequencing

This study uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the cognitive functions of the cerebellum in individuals with and without Spinocerebellar Ataxia. For Aim1 of the study, we will examine relationships between performance on a verbal working memory task and measures of brain activity and structure. For Aim 2 of the study, we will explore those relationships for a language acquisition task.

About the Study

Eligible Ataxia Types
All Spinocerebellar Ataxias confirmed with genetic testing

Type of Study
Research Study

Clinical Trial Phase
Not Applicable

Age Range
Adult 18+

Study Start Date
11/2022

Estimated Completion Date
11/2026

IRB Approval #
IRB00328214

Location(s)

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
733 North Broadway
Baltimore, MD

Contact Information

Rida Saeed (Coordinator)
rsaeed5@jh.edu
410-502-2150

John E. Desmond
jdesmon2@jhmi.edu
410-502-3583

What does participation in the study entail?

In order to participate, subjects must be able to travel to Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore to undergo non-invasive testing and approximately two hours of MRI scanning. Subjects will be administered surveys, undergo a standardized physical exam for ataxia, have their hearing tested, and complete pre-MRI training. During the MRI scans, subjects will complete a verbal working memory task and a language acquisition task.

What are the potential benefits for participants?

The study will not directly benefit participants but may contribute to knowledge relating to the effects of Spinocerebellar Ataxia on cognition. 

What are the potential risks for participants?

Risks of participating include feelings of claustrophobia and exposure to loud sounds during MRI scans as well as loss of confidentiality. To mitigate risks, subjects will be provided with earbuds, and study documents will be stored in locked cabinets and on secure servers to prevent unauthorized access to confidential information. MRI is considered a safe imaging modality for individuals who have been adequately screened for contraindications such as incompatible medical devices or hardware.

Is there financial compensation?

Yes. $25/hour

Is there travel reimbursement?

Yes. 1 night hotel stay arranged by study coordinator.

Who is eligible?

To be eligible for the study, individuals must be adults between 18 and 85 years of age with a spinocerebellar ataxia that has been confirmed with genetic testing. All participants must be right-handed, be fluent English speakers, have completed at least eight years of education, and be capable of providing informed consent. Ineligible individuals include those with known MRI contraindications, illicit drug use 30 days prior to MRI scanning, major hearing or vision loss, major psychiatric disorders, or other major neurological disorders.

Additional Information or Resources

View Other Research Opportunities

PRIME-Ataxia RCT

This study aims to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an 8-week remote intervention of high intensity aerobic exercise prior to balance training compared to an 8-week remote intervention low Read More…

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This study uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the cognitive functions of the cerebellum in individuals with and without Spinocerebellar Ataxia. For Aim1 of the study, we will examine relationships between performance on a verbal working memory task and measures of brain activity and structure. For Aim 2 of the study, we will explore those relationships for a language acquisition task.

About the Study

Eligible Ataxia Types
All Spinocerebellar Ataxias confirmed with genetic testing

Type of Study
Research Study

Clinical Trial Phase
Not Applicable

Age Range
Adult 18+

Study Start Date
11/2022

Estimated Completion Date
11/2026

IRB Approval #
IRB00328214

Location(s)

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
733 North Broadway
Baltimore, MD

Contact Information

Rida Saeed (Coordinator)
rsaeed5@jh.edu
410-502-2150

John E. Desmond
jdesmon2@jhmi.edu
410-502-3583

What does participation in the study entail?

In order to participate, subjects must be able to travel to Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore to undergo non-invasive testing and approximately two hours of MRI scanning. Subjects will be administered surveys, undergo a standardized physical exam for ataxia, have their hearing tested, and complete pre-MRI training. During the MRI scans, subjects will complete a verbal working memory task and a language acquisition task.

What are the potential benefits for participants?

The study will not directly benefit participants but may contribute to knowledge relating to the effects of Spinocerebellar Ataxia on cognition. 

What are the potential risks for participants?

Risks of participating include feelings of claustrophobia and exposure to loud sounds during MRI scans as well as loss of confidentiality. To mitigate risks, subjects will be provided with earbuds, and study documents will be stored in locked cabinets and on secure servers to prevent unauthorized access to confidential information. MRI is considered a safe imaging modality for individuals who have been adequately screened for contraindications such as incompatible medical devices or hardware.

Is there financial compensation?

Yes. $25/hour

Is there travel reimbursement?

Yes. 1 night hotel stay arranged by study coordinator.

Who is eligible?

To be eligible for the study, individuals must be adults between 18 and 85 years of age with a spinocerebellar ataxia that has been confirmed with genetic testing. All participants must be right-handed, be fluent English speakers, have completed at least eight years of education, and be capable of providing informed consent. Ineligible individuals include those with known MRI contraindications, illicit drug use 30 days prior to MRI scanning, major hearing or vision loss, major psychiatric disorders, or other major neurological disorders.

Additional Information or Resources

View Other Research Opportunities

PRIME-Ataxia RCT

This study aims to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an 8-week remote intervention of high intensity aerobic exercise prior to balance training compared to an 8-week remote intervention low Read More…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read More »
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